41 minutes ago
849 notes

The world is coming to an end. So where would you rather die? Here? or in a Jaeger!

1 hour ago
4,114 notes
5 hours ago
161,382 notes

thelostsoulsoffallenangels:

boo-tyluvr:

If a guy calls you princess in a condescending manner assert your newly appointed royal status and have him beheaded.

5 hours ago
114 notes
One of the central questions in the book is Varys’ riddle: The rich man, the priest and the king give an order to a common sellsword. Each one says kill the other two. So who has the power? Is it the priest, who supposedly speaks for God? The king, who has the power of state? The rich man, who has the gold? Of course, doesn’t the swordsman have the power? He’s the one with the sword – he could kill all three if he wanted. Or he could listen to anyone. But he’s just the average grunt. If he doesn’t do what they say, then they each call other swordsmen who will do what they say. But why does anybody do what they say? This is the fundamental mystery of power and leadership and war through all history. Going back to Vietnam, for me the cognitive dissonance came in when I realized that Ho Chi Minh actually wasn’t Sauron. Do you remember the poster during that time? WHAT IF THEY GAVE A WAR AND NOBODY CAME? That’s one of the fundamental questions here. Why did anybody go to Vietnam? Were the people who went more patriotic? Were they braver? Were they stupider? Why does anybody go? What’s all this based on? It’s all based on an illusion: You go because you’re afraid of what will happen if you don’t go, even if you don’t believe in it. But where do these systems of obedience come from? Why do we recognize power instead of individual autonomy? These questions are fascinating to me. It’s all this strange illusion, isn’t it?
— George R.R. Martin on his conceptions of power in A Song of Ice and Fire and the Vietnam War, from an interview in Rolling Stone, April 23, 2014 (x)
5 hours ago
5,526 notes

Remember when Steve dressed like a grandpa?

5 hours ago
409 notes
I came here from Romania when I was 12 years old. I had an accent. High school was tough a little bit for a few years. I wanted to fit in. I wanted to be liked. I wanted to be good-looking. I wanted to be popular. I spent a lot of time thinking, “What are these people going to think of me?” but I think part of developing a strong sense of self is that you have to kind start to trust in yourself.

make me choose
dane-dehaan asked: Dane DeHaan or Sebastian Stan
diamante-envenenado asked:  Sebastian Stan or Michael Pitt

6 hours ago
614 notes

anywhere I would’ve followed you  (x)

6 hours ago
14,110 notes
fucking sebastian stan
— everyone scrolling down their dash (via samsangel)
12 hours ago
40,315 notes
When you grow up as a girl, the world tells you the things that you are supposed to be: emotional, loving, beautiful, wanted. And then when you are those things, the world tells you they are inferior: illogical, weak, vain, empty.
— Stevie Nicks (via angelingus)